The Truth About What Happens to Your Vagina When You Haven’t Had Sex in a While


Sex can be very beneficial. It can relax you and make it easier to sleep. It can eliminate stress and even improve cardio health. But what happens to your vagina when you stop having sex? Dr. Christine Greves, an ob-gyn at Orlando Health’s center for obstetrics and gynecology in Florida, dispelled some of the rumors. 

The Truth About What Happens To Your Vagina When You Haven't Had Sex In A While

It won’t grow shut 

According to Dr. Christine Greves, your vagina won’t close. Your hymen will not grow back if you are not getting any intimate action. Your body produces progesterone and estrogen even when you are not having intercourse. 
Those hormones keep your vaginal walls not only open but flexible. Much like lotion can heal dry hands in cold weather, estrogen aids in moistening your vaginal folds which expand while you’re having sex. Your vaginal opening could, however, get smaller after a long break from sexual activity. 
Greves notes: “Over time, postmenopausal women who have a diminished supply of estrogen might notice the diameter of the vagina becoming smaller if they aren’t engaging in intercourse.” She adds: “But in my clinical experience, this usually only happens after about five [sexless] years or more.” 

It could get drier 

Your vaginal walls are actually supple and moist even when you are not sexually excited. Nevertheless, if you have not done the horizontal bop lately, your “dainty down there” could be on the arid side as you go about your busy day. While being dry is not a medical issue, it could feel somewhat uncomfortable. 
To avoid dryness, set aside some time to masturbate. If you masturbate on a regular basis the dryness will not be as likely to occur. The sexual stimulation will increase your natural moisture. 

Your sex drive might be impacted 

Greves reports that sustained abstinence will potentially lower your libido. Why? Possibly because if you’re not making love, you’re also not really feeling as sensual as you do when you are intimately active. That change can negatively impact your sex drive. Luckily, once you’re doing the deed again, you will feel sexier which will give your libido a boost. 

Arousal may take longer 

Doctor Greves states that after any period of abstinence, it could “take more time for you to get sufficiently lubricated or for the tissues to fully relax.” Your love glove automatically kicks into arousal mode when you’re doing the deed regularly. When you go without it for too long, though, you’ll need more foreplay before you’re able to get back into the game again. 
This is a good reason to take your private time slowly. Be sure to do a lot of hugging, kissing, and touching again. Put the focus on foreplay. 
Greves says this will aid in the relaxation of your vaginal tissues. It will also encourage natural lubrication. Be prepared though and use lubricated condoms and have some personal lubricant handy as well. 
Forget the rumors. There’ll be no “vagina odor” or anything else out of the ordinary. More importantly, you know what steps to take if you find yourself out of the coital loop, too.

 
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