6 Uncommon Things That Can Trigger A Heart Attack


Six Uncommon Things that can Trigger a Heart attack

Most responsible, health conscious individuals will stay away from the super-size cheeseburger, its oozing fatty oils a flashing warning sign of its potent dangers. But, aside from keeping your cholesterol levels in check and exercising regularly, there are other things that trigger a heart attack . These six heart attack triggers, though less common, are also noteworthy.

Uncommon Things That Can Trigger A Heart Attack

Unusually Heavy Meals

Even binging once in a while is a no-no. A recent study that questioned 1,986 heart attack victims revealed that 158 of those individuals ate an unusually large meal just 25 hours before the attack. It is suggested that the rising insulin rates after a very large meal can constrict the arteries. How should you avoid such a risk? Pay attention to the signs that your body is giving you while eating. If you are beginning to feel very full, it is a good idea to stop.

Related Link: Scientists Claim Drinking This Amount Of Water Before Meals Will Help You Lose Weight

Mornings

Believe it or not, chances of having a heart attack rise in the morning. This is probably because the blood and blood vessels are thicker in the morning, causing the blood to clot. The best way to avoid a morning-induced heart attack is by taking medications and blood thinners before six a.m. or as early as possible.

The Common Cold

Complications such as pneumonia and chest congestion associated with the flu or the common cold can make it hard for the lungs to absorb oxygen efficiently. This causes the heart to work harder and can result in a stress-related breakdown. Anyone with high blood pressure or who is at risk of a heart attack one should not take decongestants because they raise the body’s blood pressure. If you get a nasty cold, try to take care of yourself by sleeping well, using a dehumidifier at night, and drinking hot drinks. Licorice tea leaves are also good alternatives for decongestants.

Uncommon Things That Can Trigger A Heart Attack

Strenuous or Unusual Physical Activity

Though exercise is important, overdoing it is not advised. Every winter, thousands are injured from snow shoveling activities and most of these injuries are heart related. Strenuous activity can cause a shortage of breath, reduce oxygen flow to the blood stream, and put strain on the heart. So, keep a healthy, but not overly rigorous exercise regimen. If you feel yourself becoming short of breath while doing an activity, take a break before resuming.

Traffic Jams Can Trigger A Heart Attack

A higher risk of automobile accidents is not the only way traffic is unsafe. A recent study uncovered a correlation between traffic jams, air pollution, and heart attacks, increased exposure to air pollution being the suspected cause. Scientists interviewing heart attack survivors found that people caught in traffic jams were about three times more likely to suffer from a heart attack than those that were not. If you are at a high-risk of a heart attack, you can try to lower your exposure to pollution by closing the windows while on the road.

Cold weather Can Trigger a Heart Attack

Those who choose to nest in Florida for the winter do so for good reason. When the body gets cold, the blood pressure rises and speeds the rate of the heart in order to increase oxygen flow into the blood. This may be beneficial in preventing frostbite, but it can be stressful for the heart. If you live in a colder climate, allow yourself the luxury of adequate indoor heating and bundle up before you go out.

Heart attacks are not only prevented by watching cholesterol levels. By keeping other heart attack triggers in mind and leading a healthy, moderate lifestyle, your heart will be able to serve you well your entire lifetime.

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