Top 6 Ways to Make Your Lady Parts Smell Good

Top 6 Ways to Make Your Lady Parts Smell Good

Almost everyone who has one has had to deal with unpleasant, and subsequently embarrassing, lady part odor. The vulva and lady parts do have a typical odor, but a urine-like or fishy smell can be an indication something more serious is happening. If there’s a strange lady part odor, the first step you should take is to find the source or the cause and treat it as soon as possible to avoid any future infections or complications.

Your vulva’s bouquet can vary throughout the menstrual cycle and can be particularly apparent after making love or masturbation, sweating can also increase lady part odor. Even though it can be tempting to try, don’t douche or use a lady part deodorant as these products can actually increase irritation and cause more problems than they fix.

Bacterial vaginosis, which is an overgrowth of naturally-occurring bacteria, is the most common infection that can cause lady part odor. Trichomoniasis is an STD that can also lead to lady part odor. Gonorrhea, chlamydia, and yeast infections do not typically cause a change in odor although a particularly strong yeast infection can smell like rising dough.

Top 6 Ways to Make Your Vagina Smell Good

When lady part odor comes with cottage cheese-looking discharge that’s yellowish or whitish, or you have burning, itching, or just regular irritation of the lady part, labia, and vulva – chances are good that the culprit is an infection. The type of smell can vary from person to person and also depends on the kind of infection you have. If there’s blood in the discharge, then the infection may have reached the reproductive organs and medical attention is needed as soon as possible.

It’s good to remember that if you have lady part odor WITHOUT other symptoms, it’s likely the smell is normal. If you’re particularly worried about it, however, it’s never a bad idea to make an appointment with your gynecologist just to be sure. The medications that you take, even natural supplements, can change your personal smells to something less pleasant than what you are used to.

Good hygiene is important. The vagina and vulva are essentially a rich ecosystem; everything has to exist in the right balance and it is easy to upset it. If you use soap, antibacterials, use pools frequently, take hot baths, use lotion too close to the vulva, don’t change underwear often enough, use scented pads, or use underwear made out of stifling material (amongst other things), this delicate balance can be upset and can cause problems. Basically all you need to do is to avoid these things, rinse your vulva with warm water, avoid soap, and wear clean clothes.

A simple way to improve the health of your vagina is to consume yogurt with live and active cultures every day. You can also make a great special suppository by freezing Greek yogurt (plain, with live and active cultures) in the fingers of a glove. Insert it before going to bed with a pad in your underwear to catch the secretions.

Another powerful antibiotic you probably have in your kitchen is garlic, specifically a clove of garlic. Insert one into the vagina and keep it there for a few hours to alleviate odor.

A long, warm (not hot!) bath with two or three cups of apple cider vinegar will help restore the acidic quality of the lady part flora as well as fight off toxins that cause infection.

Change pads and tampons every four to eight hours during the menstrual cycle, as needed.

If it’s your natural body odor that is offending you, try increasing your fish, fruit, and vegetable intakes while reducing consumption of red meats.

Never think that your natural smells are bad smells; it’s designed to smell like a honey pot and that is a good thing. It’s not supposed to smell like soap or flowers!

 


Disclaimer: All content on this website is for informational purposes only and should not be considered to be a specific diagnosis or treatment plan for any individual situation. Use of this website and the information contained herein does not create a doctor-patient relationship. Always consult with your own doctor in connection with any questions or issues you may have regarding your own health or the health of others.