How to Make Thin Hair Look Thicker

The first thing one should do if their hair is thinning or falling out is to find out what’s going on. There are many reasons for people to lose their hair, quite a few of which are fixable.

One of the most common reasons for thinning hair is a thyroid malfunction, so have the thyroid checked and find out if it’s overly active, or not active enough. Be sure the doctor doesn’t downplay these concerns when they think you are “within the range of normal.” That’s just a statistical average, and a lot of people have hypothyroidism symptoms even though there are supposedly “within normal range.”

how to make thin hair look thicker

Do some research, ask around, and make the effort to find a doctor who is not just doing the cookie cutter diagnosis but is willing to experiment and help remedy any deficiency.

There are other health issues that can lead to hair loss, so be on the lookout for any other symptoms that may help the doctor diagnose properly.

On to some tips to make hair look thicker:

If hair is thin at the crown but still thick in front, try bangs to create a fuller look. To go a step further, take a slice of hair underneath the bangs and color it two shades darker than the rest of the hair color, says hairstylist Sam Villa, education artistic director for Redken. When bringing the top layer of fringe down over it, the bangs will look thicker because of the deeper color underneath.

Ask your stylist to cut the underlayer of the hair half an inch shorter than the top layer. This will add fullness. Never let anyone use a razor, though, because that can create frayed ends that make the hair look wispier. To give heft to fine or thin hair, keep ends blunt.
“Peroxide doubles the thickness of each strand,” says colorist Michael Canale of Canale Salon in Beverly Hills. “It swells the hair shaft, which makes your hair look and feel fuller.” Another reason for highlights: When hair color has dimension (a mix of shades), it creates the illusion of density. Also, keep in mind that hair color should match the color near the scalp as closely as possible if camouflaging a wide part.

Keep hair above shoulder length. “Once it hits the tops of your shoulders, your hair breaks up and looks thinner,” says hairstylist Nick Stenson, artistic director of Matrix. If it’s shorter, it will appear thicker. In the same note, try for some luscious curls for instant volume.

Try a protein hair treatment, the best ingredient to use is egg. Take one or two eggs, depending on length of hair, and beat them well. Apply to wet hair and leave in for five to ten minutes. Wash hair in lukewarm water with shampoo – this treatment can be done three to four times a week. Add the gel from one or two leaves of aloe vera once a week for an extra boost.

Mousse gives roots a boost and creates volume without stickiness. Avoid creams and heavy gels, which weigh hair down. (Spray gels can effectively add some height, when used in moderation.) Work the mousse in to damp hair and comb through so all of the strands are coated
Don’t subject the hair to more wear and tear than necessary—let it air-dry 80 percent, then use a round brush to lift the roots and smooth the ends. Don’t part the hair like you normally would do before blow-drying, says hairstylist Stacy Ho of Cutler Salon in New York City. “It will wind up flat along the part, which is exactly where you want some height.” Instead, part the hair on the opposite side. When done blow-drying, flip it back and there’ll be some gorgeous volume.

If the hair is full at the crown, but wispy from the mid-length to ends, clip-in hair extensions can boost into a lush style in minutes. Today’s synthetic versions look completely natural (and cost under $100)

As with any beauty illusion, knowing what to do with the tools available and the confidence to pull it off are the major components. You’re gorgeous, and there’s only one you, so get out there and work it.

Bonus: How to Make Fine and Low Density Natural Hair Look Thicker

How to Make Thin Hair Look Thicker
By Khrystyana Kirton
Edited by Stephanie Dawson
Reviewed by Nima Shei MD


Disclaimer: All content on this website is for informational purposes only and should not be considered to be a specific diagnosis or treatment plan for any individual situation. Use of this website and the information contained herein does not create a doctor-patient relationship. Always consult with your own doctor in connection with any questions or issues you may have regarding your own health or the health of others.