4 Good Ways Seniors Can Reduce Retirement Anxiety


One thing we can all agree on when it comes to retirement, is that age is no longer the single determining factor. Those of retirement age now vary from the age of 50 to 80 and beyond. Factors such as career, health, and financial standing all contribute to when someone decides to finally retire.

If you have reached that critical stage in your life and are experiencing some degree of anxiety about this upcoming abrupt change, this article is for you. In this article, we cover tips and techniques anyone soon to retire can implement to manage and possibly excel at this exciting phase of life. Read on.

1. Work Part Time –

Something many retirees are choosing to do instead of a full on retirement is to go at it from a part time angle. What does this mean? It means working part time. If you’re able to retain some sort of schedule at your current place of employment, then start here – if not, then seek part time elsewhere. However the key is to keep contributing your skills and vast experience to the workforce in a lesser capacity. This keeps you active, nets you a recurring income in addition to your retiree benefit and keeps you social as well, which brings us to tip number two below.

2. Social Support –

One of things older workers lose when they decide to leave the traditional workforce behind is the camaraderie and social support of fellow co workers. However the good news is that there are many healthy alternatives to this established social setting. Certain retirement communities if you choose to go that route offer social support in spades, you can join local Meetup groups targeted at those aged 50 or older, you can seek out new friendships or rekindle old ones, etc. Don’t forget also about the many wonderful online communities available as well for socializing.

4 Good Ways Seniors Can Reduce Retirement Anxiety

3. Counseling –

Sometimes talking through our issues can give us a new perspective and center us in a way that other methods can’t. If this describes you, then seek out a local counseling center that specializes in issues about leaving the workforce and also about how to manage exciting changes such as retirement. You might discover that you actually love the extra time you now have, or the many new social connections you have made and or simply the idea that you never have to punch in a clock again or deal with “the man”. These are all good things and maybe a session or two with a counselor can provide that needed boost to see things in a new light.
4. Prolong It –

Who says you have to retire at a certain age? Maybe you don’t need to retire at 65, 62 or any other specific number. Do it when it feels right to you and if you can prolong it – do so. Depending on your circumstances you might be able to do just that and leave the workforce later than expected. I know several family members who have waited close to 70 before leaving for good. So keep this in mind as the time nears.

Retirement has been an exciting and gradual change for many, it can be for you too. Find ways to make this change something you look forward to (instead of dread) and seek out whatever help you need to manage it as best as you can. Our tips above are a good starting ground and hopefully we have gotten the wheels turning a bit for you in that direction. Do share with us what concerns you have and or how this article has helped you. Let us know below in the comment section.

Guest article written by Missy Diaz and brought to you by Lakewood Manor – a senior retirement community in Virginia. Missy is a senior lifestyle blogger who contributes to several sites and blog on the web – you can follow her on Twitter to read all her articles.

 
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