Smoking And Vitamin-D


Most of us, including three quarters of American adults are vitamin-D deficient, which may cause serious problems. According to National Institute of Health, “vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that is naturally present in very few foods, added to others, and available as a dietary supplement. It is also produced endogenously when ultraviolet rays from sunlight strike the skin and trigger vitamin D synthesis… Vitamin D promotes calcium absorption in the intestine and maintains adequate serum calcium and phosphate concentrations to enable normal mineralization of bone…Vitamin D has other roles in the body, including modulation of cell growth, neuromuscular and immune function, and reduction of inflammation…”

According to a new study led by Nancy E. Lange, M.D., MPH, of the Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, vitamin-D may delay deterioration of smokers lungs. The study performed on more than 600 adults for over 20 years indicates that vitamin D sufficiency has a protective effect on lung function in smokers (Vitamin D sufficiency is defined as serum vitamin D levels of >20 ng/ml).

Here is the list of the foods with the highest amount of vitamin D:

  • Cod liver oil
  • Swordfish
  • Salmon (sockeye)
  • Tuna fish
  • Orange juice fortified with vitamin D
  • Milk
  • Yogurt, fortified with 20% of the DV for vitamin D
 
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