Everything You Wanted To Know About Mosquitos

When it comes to living in New Jersey, we have a variety of seasons. Most of us appreciate the warmer months the most over that of the chill of the winter. However, with these warmer months, we run into a small foe whom no one likes. What little terror are we talking about, the mosquito of course.

Delsea NJ mosquitos control points out that mosquitoes carry malaria, dengue fever, and encephalitis, but what else do you really know about mosquitos? What are the best ways to avoid and repel mosquitos? When we get bit by mosquitos, what’s the best way to take the itch away?

Today, we will cover all these questions so you can cover just about every question you had about mosquitos. Let’s get started!

mosquito6a

Mosquito History and Facts

Currently, mosquitos date back 100 million years and there are 3,500 species residing on the earth. Mosquitos tend to live anywhere that’s not continually frozen. Mosquitos that bite are female as they need blood to produce their eggs.

Mosquitos have poor eyesight, but have extreme thermal receptors on their antenna that helps locate blood near the surface of the skin. Mosquitoes pick up on your carbon monoxide as their smell is 10,000 times better than that of a human. They also don’t actually bite you; they stab you with its proboscis and then drink your blood.

The average lifespan of a mosquito is 10 to 100 days, whether they be male or female. The typical female mosquito can lay around 200 eggs, and the eggs can survive up to five years. From egg to adult takes about seven days.

That sound you hear mosquitos make is done through the use of female’s wings as they move around 500 times a second. The sound acts as a mating call so the males can hone in on the females.

How to Avoid and Repel Mosquitos

To avoid and repel mosquitos follow the tips below:

  • Avoid wearing dark clothes as mosquitos.
  • Avoid eating high-potassium foods as mosquito’s zone in on this.
  • Avoid having standing water in glasses or other containers as this is a perfect breeding ground for mosquitos.
  • Repel mosquitos with DEET repellent as this blocks carbon dioxide.
  • Repel mosquitos by eating garlic as they can’t stand the smell. Remember mosquitoes smell is 10,000 greater than our own.
  • Repel mosquitos with fabric softener sheets as it disrupts their smell.
  • Drink tonic water as it’s known to cut down on your carbon dioxide levels.

How to Take Deal with Bites

 

tobasco-1

Having mosquito bites are not pleasant as they can itch tremendously and swell up. Here are some easy tricks you can use to take down the swelling and get rid of the itch.

  • Use Cortizone 10 and put them on the bite directly.
  • Try putting a bit of baking soda with water into a paste and apply it on the bite.
  • Apply some liquid soap on the bite without rubbing it off.
  • Apply some Vicks vapor rub.
  • Apply some Benadryl anti-itch spray.
  • Apply a dab of hot sauce as the cayenne pepper works its magic to ease pain and reduce the itch.

Conclusion

Now that you’ve learned a bit about the vampire of the insect world you can put your mind at ease. Mosquitos have been around a long time and will continue to be pests that we need to irradiate every single year. We hope that you’ve learned something that you might know how to avoid and repel them all while giving you helpful treatments if you do get bit.

 


Disclosure Policy:

This blog is a collaborative blog written by a group of individuals. This blog accepts forms of cash advertising, sponsorship, paid insertions or other forms of compensation. The compensation received may influence the advertising content, topics or posts made in this blog. That content, advertising space or post may not always be identified as paid or sponsored content. The owner(s) of this blog is compensated to provide opinion on products, services, websites and various other topics. Even though the owner(s) of this blog receives compensation for our posts or advertisements, we always give our honest opinions, findings, beliefs, or experiences on those topics or products. The views and opinions expressed on this blog are purely the bloggers’ own. Any product claim, statistic, quote or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider or party in question. This blog does contain content which might present a conflict of interest. This content will always be identified.

 
Disclaimer: All content on this website is for informational purposes only and should not be considered to be a specific diagnosis or treatment plan for any individual situation. Use of this website and the information contained herein does not create a doctor-patient relationship. Always consult with your own doctor in connection with any questions or issues you may have regarding your own health or the health of others.