Wonderful Things That Aspirin Can Do For Your Hair

The innumerable benefits of aspirin include much more than just pain relief from aches and pains. Many people know that it is used long-term as a heart attack preventative, and studies indicate that it may even limit the risk of developing certain types of cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. But aspirin has countless other possible benefits, and several of them pertain to the hair. Learn about the wonderful things that aspirin can do for your hair.

Aspirin and Its Benefits for the Hair, Home and Body

Hair Color Restorative

Getting your hair wet in a chlorinated pool may have a detrimental effect on its color, especially for people with light-colored hair. Fortunately, you can typically restore your hair’s original color by dissolving a few aspirins in a warm glass of water. Apply the mixture generously to your hair and allow it to sit for 10 to 15 minutes.

Shinier Hair

The salicylic acid in aspirin helps to make hair shinier by opening the hair cuticles and removing any build-up that may ruin the hair’s natural luster.

Dandruff Control

Yes, it’s even possible to control dandruff with aspirin by adding it to your shampoo. It might seem odd, but this is a powerful tip for eliminating dandruff, which makes your hair appear faded and dried out. The salicylic acid in aspirin works to dissolve dead skin cells and shampoo buildup on the scalp, essentially acting as a clarifying agent. To avoid depleting the natural oils in your hair, use aspirins sparingly, preferably by mixing a couple of crushed pills to your shampoo about once a week.

Possible Hair Loss Remedy

Experts have theorized that animals with elevated amounts of prostaglandin D2 are totally bald. This hypothesis has led researchers to hunt for a hair loss remedy that works for any kind of hair loss by inhibiting the production of prostaglandin D2 in the body, and aspirin is one of the most well-known prostaglandin inhibitors. While aspirin’s effects on hair loss have not been formally proven, it has been observed that some people have had hair regrowth while using aspirin in their daily regimens.

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Aspirin for the Skin

Aspirin also helps to clear skin by drying up pimples and reducing inflammation. By sloughing off dead skin cells on the top layer of the epidermis, the salicylic acid in aspirin minimizes the chance of pores becoming clogged, which is a common cause of acne outbreaks. It also reduces redness and swelling, which is helpful for people with rosacea. Psoriasis sufferers can also reap benefits from the salicylic acid in aspirin, as it can make the lesions smaller and alleviate the itch.

Aspirin for Ingrown Hairs

Ingrown hairs can be painful hurdles on the road to having soft, hairless skin. Ingrown hairs are regular hairs that become trapped and grow into the skin rather than out of it, and they commonly occur due to excessive shaving. These hairs are not only unattractive but painful as well, since they usually result in skin inflammation. Masks and face creams made with aspirin can be used to facilitate both the removal and prevention of these pesky ingrown hairs. To prevent the occurrence of ingrown hairs, apply a facial mask that includes aspirin right after shaving or waxing.

Household Uses for Aspirin

On top of all these uses, aspirin is a versatile home remedy in many situations. It can be used to preserve live flowers, as a garden rooting agent, for removing difficult stains, and for lessening the inflammation and pain of insect bites, while also providing antifungal properties to reduce the risk of infection. It’s safe to say that aspirin is a true jack-of-all-trades that ought to have a place in every household.

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