Why Sleep is Important for You

Getting a good night’s sleep is more important than you may think.

The importance of sleep is definitely underestimated by the general public. Some people may say all they need is five hours of sleep and if they’re getting that they’re good to go, but what they’re not realizing is that they’re probably not functioning at their full potential.

Sleep is much more than simple rest. The brain and body don’t shut down during sleep; rather, they perform important tasks that promote both mental and physical health, such as producing hormones that help repair cells and fight off illness. Proper sleep contributes significantly to feeling better and functioning better when awake.

A 2011 Swedish study found that “sleep-deprived people appear less healthy, less attractive and more tired compared with when they are well rested.” Conversely, according to volumes of research, inadequate sleep can cause people to be irritable, have slower response times, make unwise decisions, have trouble with relationships, perform poorly at work or school and become depressed more easily, not to mention increasing the risk for high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, obesity, cognitive difficulties and other medical problems.

In fact, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, citing societal factors such as round-the-clock access to technology and the incidence of disorders such as insomnia and sleep apnea, has called insufficient sleep a public health epidemic.

Why Sleep is Important for You

The amount of sleep a person needs depends upon their age. Generally, newborns require 16 to 18 hours daily, preschoolers 11 to 12 hours, school-age children and teenagers at least 10 hours and adults (including seniors) between seven and eight hours.

There are some individuals, whom we call ‘short sleepers,’ who probably will do OK with maybe only six hours, and at the other extreme there are ‘long sleepers,’ who require nine or 10 hours, but the percentage of these extremes are very small. Most of us, after adolescence, really need seven or eight hours of sleep, and on a regular basis.

It’s not just the amount of time spent sleeping that counts. There’s a quality factor, too.

There are people who, for example, say that they can drink coffee and don’t have trouble sleeping, but that’s simply not true. They may not have trouble falling asleep but the quality of their sleep is not what they need. They don’t have the deep sleep that is the most restful, or they have trouble waking up.

The same is true with alcohol, having a drink before going to bed may help you fall asleep but the quality of sleep isn’t good, so you’re probably not going to feel rested at all the next day.

The first thing anyone who has, or thinks they may have, a sleeping problem should do is practice appropriate sleep hygiene, but what if following the tips: allowing sufficient time for sleep, going to bed and waking up the same time every day, removing distractions from the bedroom, doesn’t help?

The next step should be to see a doctor, either a primary care physician or a sleep specialist, because many sleeping problems are caused by other health or medical issues. Insomnia, for example, can be a reaction to a prescription drug, while restless leg syndrome is linked to iron deficiency.

sleep_deprivation

Why Sleep is Important for You
By PositiveMed Team
Edited By Stephanie Dawson

 
 
Disclaimer: All content on this website is for informational purposes only and should not be considered to be a specific diagnosis or treatment plan for any individual situation. Use of this website and the information contained herein does not create a doctor-patient relationship. Always consult with your own doctor in connection with any questions or issues you may have regarding your own health or the health of others.